Category Archives: review

With a Zero at its Heart: Update (2)

Back with some recent links to ZERO-related stuff: two interviews, a review, a piece on the structure of the book in response to a request from Isabel Costello, and some news. The first interview, with Megan Taylor, appeared in the … Continue reading

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With a Zero at its Heart: update

With a Zero at its Heart was published at the end of May, almost four months ago now. They’ve been busy months, but it really is about time I produced a round-up of what’s been said about the book since … Continue reading

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Winter in Berlin, by Ian R Mitchell

I recently reviewed Winter in Berlin by Ian R Mitchell for TripFiction, one of my favourite sites (as it should be for anyone who loves both to travel and to read, and thinks the two can be fruitfully combined). I … Continue reading

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Books, by Charlie Hill, and Curtains, by Victor Olliver

Charlie Hill’s Books – at least in part – is set among the shabby shelves of the kind of independent bookshop all too rarely found these days in provincial England: in this case, Birmingham. Its hero, Richard Anger – Hill’s explicit … Continue reading

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Black Country, by Joel Lane, and Marionettes, by Claire Massey

Among my more vivid memories of television as a child was the story of a young man who meets an attractive older woman in Venice and is lured back to her room. They’re already in bed when he realises the … Continue reading

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Alison Moore, The Lighthouse, and Cristoph Simon, Zbinden’s Progress

I seem to have been reading a lot about walking recently, but everything I read takes me back to a single text called In Praise of Walking. It was written by Thomas A Clark some years ago and, even though I … Continue reading

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Andrés Neuman, Traveller of the Century

I first came across the name of Andrés Neuman a few months ago, when I got round to reading the number of Granta dedicated to young Spanish-language novelists.  Ostensibly about grief, his story – “After Helena” – is a brightly … Continue reading

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